It's been big news for a week now; that shipping vessel that got stuck in the Suez Canal. How would the 'Ever Given' look in say, Horsetooth Reservoir?

The Ever Given got stuck inside the Suez Canal on March 23, 2021, after strong winds turned the boat sideways and it got lodged into the sides of the canal. The Ever Given (though it says 'Evergreen' on the side) was freed from its problematic state on March 29, 2021.

The 1,300-foot, 22,000-ton vessel being stuck caused millions of dollars in losses across the world with over 350 ships being blocked from transporting their goods while stirring curiosity across the globe as well: 'How did THAT happen?'

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Here are a couple of funny tweets about the whole thing:

 



Here's a question? How would the Ever Given look if it were in Horsetooth Reservoir? Someone else has that same kind of question, as they came up with a site that puts the Ever Given anywhere on the planet: 'Ever Given, Every Where.'

You could plop the Ever Given down at Canvas Stadium, but I kept with bodies of water. Horsetooth Reservoir, Lake Loveland, Windsor Lake, and Boyd Lake.

BOYD LAKE

WINDSOR LAKE

LAKE LOVELAND

HORSETOOTH RESERVOIR

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